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Suffragist of the Month - May 2015

Suffragist of the Month – May 2015

Katherine Duer Mackay 1878 – 1930 Suffragists were often accused of being unattractive, unfeminine, and terrible mothers. None of these slurs were ever flung at Katherine Duer Mackay, however. She was decidedly one of the most beautiful, gracious and feminine suffrage leaders of the day. When Harriot Stanton Blatch, Elizabeth Cady Stanton’s daughter, took up […]

Suffragist of the Month - April 2015

Suffragist of the Month – April 2015

Rose Schneiderman, 1882 – 1972 “The woman worker needs bread, but she needs roses too,” was Rose Schneiderman’s favorite slogan. Bread was the sustenance, but roses were the joy – recreational facilities, schools, access to health care – anything that would help the working woman improve life for her and her family. Rose Schneiderman was born […]

Suffragist of the Month - March 2015

Suffragist of the Month – March 2015

Kate Malcolm Sheppard,  1847 –  1934 American women certainly had no exclusive claim to the quest for woman suffrage. Women around the world worked tirelessly for political equality, experiencing much the same frustrations and, ultimately successes as our suffragists did. Katherine (Kate) Malcolm was born around March 10, 1847 in Liverpool, England, and moved to New Zealand in […]

Suffrage March a Great Success!

Suffrage March a Great Success!

Our Suffrage Parade to celebrate the beginning of Women’s History Month was a huge success! Sunday, March 1 found an enthusiastic group of men and women parading in Lake Ronkonkoma. Co-sponsered by the Long Island Women Suffrage Association and the Lake Ronkonkoma Heritage Association, the march was a huge success. After parading down Hawkins Road […]

Suffragist of the Month - February 2015

Suffragist of the Month – February 2015

Lavinia Lloyd Dock, 1858 – 1956 Lavinia Lloyd Dock was born Feb. 26, 1858 in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Despite a privileged family upbringing, she chose the rigors of training as a nurse at Bellevue Hospital in New York City, and worked as a visiting nurse among the poor. An early advocate of women’s rights, she was arrested for […]

One Hundred Years Ago Today, January 12, 1915

One Hundred Years Ago Today, January 12, 1915

On January 12, 1915 Washington DC was abuzz with both suffrage proponents and opponents, all gathered to witness another historic vote on an amendment to the Constitution granting women the right to vote. Unfortunately, as we know now, they were not successful, but time for the anti-suffragists was running out. The New York Times reported “Suffragists Lose […]

Suffragist of the Month – January, 2015

MAUD WOOD PARK Maud Wood Park was born in Boston January 25, 1871. In her senior year at Radcliffe College she heard a speech by Miss Alice Stone Blackwell, daughter of Lucy Stone, which inspired her to join the Massachusetts Suffrage Association. She and fellow student Inez Haynes Irwin later founded the Equal College Suffrage League, […]

Newly Discovered Susan B. Anthony Letters Preserved

The New York Times reported today that newly discovered letters exchanged between Susan B. Anthony and fellow suffragist Rachel Foster Avery escaped the danger of being sold at auction, and instead were purchased by the University of Rochester who will digitize and preserve them in their Susan B. Anthony collection. Rachel Foster Avery and Susan […]

Mary Louise Booth Home May Join Historic Site Lists

Mary Louise Booth Home May Join Historic Site Lists

The office of New York State Parks recently announced the nomination of the home of noted suffragist and abolitionist Mary Louse Booth for placement on the federal and state registers of historic places, one of twenty-two sites so designated. The house is located Main Street in Yaphank. The announcement read: Mary Louise Booth Girlhood House, Yaphank […]

Suffragist of the Month – December 2014

Fanny Garrison Villard 1844 – 1928 When Helen Frances Garrison was born in Boston, December 16, 1844, women enjoyed few rights, and political equality was just a dream. But Helen Frances (called Fanny) was fortunate  to claim as her parents Helen Eliza Garrison and noted abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. Both Garrisons valued education for girls as […]

A Sad Anniversary – November 15th, The Night of Terror

Today, November 15 marks the 97th anniversary of a very dark day in the history of the woman suffrage movement. It is the anniversary of the “Night of Terror,” a night of beatings and torture endured by the suffragists in the Occoquan Prison in Virginia. As reported on the Turning Point Memorial website: In 1917, […]

One Hundred Years Ago Today

One Hundred Years Ago Today

November 9, 1914, One hundred years ago today The Brooklyn Daily Eagle reported that, after viewing the election returns, the suffragists were able to re-write the map of suffrage states to include Montana and Nevada. Dr. Ana Shaw confidently predicted that “in ten years the entire country will be won for equal suffrage.” Happily, we […]

Suffragist of the Month - November

Suffragist of the Month – November

Sarah Moore Grimké,  1792 – 1873 Sarah Moore Grimké was born in Charleston, South Carolina November 26, 1792, to a wealthy and influential family, one of fourteen children. From an early age she railed against the strictures imposed upon the girls of the family, particularly the lack of a comprehensive education. While her brothers learned mathematics, […]

One Hundred Years Ago Today

One Hundred Years Ago Today

According to the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, October 13, 1914: Suffragists in Session – Parade and Make Addresses in Rochester, NY With Yellow pennants bearing the war cry “Votes for Women,” fluttering from hundreds of automobiles, members of the New York State Woman Suffrage Association from all parts of the State participated in a spectacular parade here […]

Suffragist of The Month - October

Suffragist of The Month – October

Belva Ann Lockwood 1830 – 1917  Today, in October of 2014 with three women sitting on the Supreme Court it seems unbelievable that until 1879 women attorneys (of which there were few) were not even permitted to present cases before the Supreme Court. Women were discouraged from becoming attorneys, since most law schools would not […]